Educational Foundation Projects

The School of Applied Technology campus in Wellsville is owned and maintained by the Educational Foundation. The Foundation also funds the Building Trades programs' hands-on laboratories. The 21-acre parcel consists of more than 20 buildings with some 800 students enrolled in 18 programs. The programs stress "learning by doing." They incorporate traditional classroom experience with comprehensive "on-the-job" laboratory experiences. Since 1996, the Foundation has invested over $1.6 million in improvements on the campus.

As part of its community outreach, the Foundation supports student projects that provide real-world experiences and enhance local properties and facilities.

Scholarships - The Foundation has been supporting student scholarships since 1946. Since 1993, the Foundation has funded ASC scholarships totaling more than $1.2 million.

Work Grant - This is a program which allows students to work on campus and deal with work-related situations. For the last 10 years, the Foundation has invested over $162,000 in work grants.

Phi Theta Kappa and Sigma Tau Awards - These awards are presented to the senior with the highest cumulative grade point index in each of the College's three schools - Applied Technology, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the School of Architecture, Management, and Engineering Technology.

zero energy demonstration homeCommunity Projects - As part of its community outreach, the Foundation supports student projects that provide real-world experiences working with non-for-profits to enhance local properties and facilities. Houses are built and detailed by students (view photos) in a subdivision owned by the Educational Foundation of Alfred, Inc. These houses, valued at upwards of $200,000, are subsequently sold and occupied. Under the supervision of their instructors, tomorrow's craftspeople prove themselves by building for discerning homeowners. For the students, it's an unmatched opportunity to put their learning into practice. The result is that students can enter the construction industry with a real world level of expertise that is not experienced by students who learn in more restricted, less realistic settings.