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Campus News

SAMC ribbon-cutting and 50th anniversary celebration scheduled

Posted Date: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 16:00

Alfred State’s new Sustainable Advanced Manufacturing Center (SAMC) will be officially dedicated on Friday, Oct. 14 at 3 p.m. The public is invited to attend the ribbon-cutting, along with a celebration of the 50th anniversary for the School of Applied Technology campus in Wellsville.

Elected leaders scheduled to attend the event include: New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul; State Sen. Catharine Young, R-Olean; State Assemblyman Joseph Giglio, R,C,I-Gowanda; and Allegany County Board of Legislators Chairman Curt Crandall, R-Belfast.

The $5 million, 16,000-square-foot facility includes large open bays for hands-on learning by welding and machine tool technology students. It was funded through the State University of New York (SUNY) 2020 Challenge Grant Program and is the first building on the Wellsville campus funded by the State of New York. The Educational Foundation of Alfred, Inc. is leasing the site to SUNY for 30 years. Empire State Development and the Western New York Regional Economic Council supported the project with $500,000 for equipment inside SAMC.

The ceremony will also kick off a yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary for the Wellsville campus. Displays will line the entrance hall to the new building, showcasing the skilled trades training available from Alfred State in culinary arts, building construction, automotive, electrical, computerized design, and manufacturing.

An historical display will include a congratulatory telegram dated Oct. 21, 1966 and addressed to the Wellsville Vocational Training School from Robert F. Kennedy, who was serving as a US Senator from New York at the time of the school’s opening.

The Wellsville campus was originally developed as an oil refinery, and was once one of the largest in the Pennsylvania oil fields. Opening in 1901, it was rebuilt by Sinclair after a major fire in 1938, and played a significant role during World War II. As regional oil supplies dwindled, the refinery struggled, closing in 1958 after a second significant fire. Many of the refinery’s buildings still stand today and are used for job training to feed high-need industries such as advanced manufacturing.

Classes began in Wellsville on Oct. 19, 1966 for 110 students enrolled in five programs taught by 10 faculty members. These five initial programs were automotive service, building construction, drafting, electrical service, and food service.

In 1966, Alfred State students and staff erect a sign in Wellsville as the first classes were held on the former Sinclair Refinery site.
In 1966, Alfred State students and staff erect a sign in Wellsville as the
first classes were held on the former Sinclair Refinery site.

Additional dates for 50th anniversary events include:


“It Takes a Village” effort brings Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative to Alfred community

Posted Date: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 11:00

Having learned earlier this year of the impact that the Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative can have on preventing interpersonal or sexual violence, a group of Alfred State and Alfred University employees recently came together to share the initiative with nearly four dozen members of the village community.

On Sept. 20, 47 community members gathered at the Terra Cotta Coffee House for a two-hour training on the Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative. In attendance were several members of each of the Alfred State-recognized Greek organizations, as well as employees of GJ’s, Alex’s, Zippy’s, BB Shenanigan’s, and AE Crandall Hook and Ladder Company.

Green Dot is a program that asks its participants to imagine a map of their community, and how every time there is an instance of interpersonal or sexual violence, a Red Dot would be placed on the area in which that occurred.

community members at Terra Cotta Coffee House for Green Dot trainingHowever, whenever a bystander intervenes in these situations or takes proactive measures to prevent these actions from occurring, each Red Dot is then replaced with a Green Dot. The goal of the program when employed is - and has been statistically proven successful - to reduce violence within that community.

In early January, four employees from Alfred State and six from Alfred University had gathered together at Finger Lakes Community College (FLCC) for a four-day Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative Train-the-Trainer workshop. These bystander trainings were made possible thanks to an existing federal Centers for Disease Control and Rape Prevention and Education Program grant. All SUNY campuses were eligible to participate at no cost to the school.

Both Alfred colleges then implemented separate, but similar programs on each campus. According to Alfred State Chief Diversity Officer and Title IX Coordinator Nikkie Hockenberry, “it soon became evident that the only place that was left unaffected by this program was the actual village that houses all of the students late at night and on weekends, where harmful incidents were more likely to occur, or at least begin, during these times.” She then came up with the “It Takes a Village” effort.

“It seemed like a natural partnership between the two colleges,” she said. “We are all so committed to the safety of our students, and in talking to the business owners, we all have a common goal, and in order to reach it, it really does take a village. I was thrilled with the turnout from this small community; it’s the best part about living and working in Alfred, that level of involvement. We are really an amazing community and this only further demonstrates that.”

During the community-oriented event at the Terra Cotta, Green Dot trainers Cody Herman and Hockenberry from Alfred State and Amanda Khodorkovskaya and Steve Smith from Alfred University walked participants through a scenario-based training in which they were given tools on how to safely and effectively intervene in situations where there was potential for a harmful outcome to occur.

Participants were able to dialogue about these situations and develop strategies based upon their comfort level, in which they could insert themselves into the situation to potentially change the outcome of the incident, with the common goal of keeping members of the Alfred community safe.

Participant Jack Azueta, brother of Pi Rho Zeta, said, “It was an awesome experience going through Green Dot. I now see things from a different perspective. I will use what I have learned to protect and prevent occurrences that might happen in the future."

Less than a week after the training was held, the effects were being felt in the community. GJ’s Manager Jade DellaPenna, who was present, along with several of her employees, noted an immediate change in the local nightlife.

“The Green Dot training has helped our staff find confidence in our methods, as well as garner enthusiasm in our efforts,” she said. “Preventing interpersonal or sexual violence has always been an uphill battle, and we are grateful for the community and campuses to work together on such a crucial issue.”

As part of an ongoing outreach effort, local Greek houses and businesses will be providing numbers and stories of their Green Dots on a monthly basis to Hockenberry and Herman, which will then be logged and shared with the community.

To learn more about the Green Dot Program, visit https://www.livethegreendot.com/. For more on the “It Takes a Village” Initiative, please contact Hockenberry at hockennr@alfredstate.edu.


Dr. Kellogg authors new book on boy detective Barry Baskerville

Posted Date: Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 09:45

Barry Baskerville’s Blue Bicycle cover imageDr. Richard Kellogg, professor emeritus of psychology at Alfred State, is the author of a new book titled “Barry Baskerville's Blue Bicycle” (Airship 27, 2016).

This is the fourth entry in a popular series of mysteries for children, and is available on Amazon.com. The book contains color illustrations by Gary Kato, a prominent Hawaiian artist.

“Barry Baskerville's Blue Bicycle” shows children how close observations and logical deductions can improve their problem-solving skills. The hero of the story is a precocious youngster named Barry Baskerville who dreams of becoming a great detective like Sherlock Holmes.

Upon receiving a new bicycle for his birthday, Barry rides around Watsonville doing chores for his elderly neighbors and finding lost pets for their owners. Barry even succeeds, to his great delight, in using his bicycle to help the police apprehend a notorious burglar.

Dr. Kellogg is the author of four previous books about Sherlock Holmes. He enjoys introducing children to the fascinating world of Holmes and his faithful companion, Dr. John Watson.


Alfred State named a Lead Advisory Institution once again

Posted Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 - 10:45

For the second straight year, NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, the leading voice for the student affairs profession, has named Alfred State a Lead Advisory Institution in its national initiative on civic learning and democratic engagement.

This year, Alfred State will be part of a group of nearly 100 institutions dedicated to promoting civic learning and democratic engagement as a core function of the Division of Student Affairs. The Lead Initiative offers unique professional development opportunities, targeted resources, networking, and recognition for its Lead Institutions.

The college has participated in NASPA’s Lead Initiative since 2012, but was named a Lead Advisory Institution for the first time last year. In this role, Alfred State’s responsibilities include mentoring other Lead Institutions and helping NASPA staff create and execute strategy, publications, and online learning content for the initiative moving forward.

Gregory Sammons, Alfred State vice president for Student Affairs, said Alfred State is proud to again be recognized by NASPA as a Lead Advisory Institution, and that the college “considers it the highest compliment to our students.”

“The recognition illustrates that our students learn not only about social issues,” Sammons said, “but also how to apply knowledge in order to actively engage these challenges and directly be a part of the solutions in our communities.”

By combining real-world learning situations with civic engagement opportunities, Alfred State students make significant contributions to communities around the world and are frequently among the first to lend their skills and knowledge to those in need. Last year, Alfred State students contributed 80,000 hours of service, civic leadership, and workforce-ready knowledge to communities in need.

To learn more about NASPA’s Lead Initiative and view a complete listing of participating institutions, please visit the NASPA website at https://www.naspa.org/rpi/lead-initiative.


The Wrecks coming to Alfred State Oct. 18

Posted Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 08:15

Alfred State is excited to announce that up-and-coming indie rock band The Wrecks will be performing at 7 p.m. Oct. 18 in the Orvis Activities Center.

The Los Angeles-based group consists of Wellsville native Nick Anderson (vocals/guitar), Nick Schmidt (guitar), Harrison Nussbaum (guitar), Aaron Kelley (bass), and Billy Nally (drums).

A description of the group on its Facebook page states, “Heavily influenced by groups such as The Pixies, The Strokes, Weezer, and Vampire Weekend, this five-piece isn’t afraid to blend undeniably catchy choruses with lyrics and vocals that have an underlying substance and a certain quirk that give them their young, signature sound.”

On March 18 this year, The Wrecks released their first single, “Favorite Liar,” which has been featured on SiriusXM’s Alt Nation and and has close to 1.3 million plays on Spotify. The group’s debut EP “We Are The Wrecks,” which includes “Favorite Liar,” “I Don’t Like You,” and “Turn It Up,” is now available on Spotify, iTunes, Apple Music, and more.

members of the band, The Wrecks
l-r, members of the band, Nick Schmidt, Nick Anderson, Harrison Nussbaum, Aaron Kelley, and Billy Nally

Already, the band has had their songs played on two NBC shows, one CBS show (Limitless), and in a Lions Gate feature film. After a 14-city mostly West Coast and Midwest show in the spring, they were asked to join Nothing But Thieves on a 33-city North American tour that started in Canada and ends in Florida.

A number of the shows, including one at the Foundry in Philadelphia in late October, have sold out. The band has concerts in Columbus, OH and in New York City in mid-October, and were honored to get a chance to play a hometown show for Nick Anderson on their travel day between those cities in Alfred on Tuesday, Oct. 18.

Tickets for the concert at are on sale now for $5 each, and can be purchased at the campus store or online at www.alfredstatebookstore.com.

For more information on The Wrecks, visit http://www.wearethewrecks.com/.


Kiddie Ag Day a great success

Posted Date: Monday, October 3, 2016 - 10:45
First- and second-graders at the college farm
First- and second-graders learn how dairy cows are milked.

Always a fun and educational way to teach young students about agriculture, Alfred State once again hosted Kiddie Ag Day on Sept. 22.

Participating schools included Alfred-Almond, Andover, Scio, Bath, Bolivar-Richburg, Canaseraga, Cuba-Rushford, and Genesee Valley.

During the day, approximately 500 first- and second-graders toured the college farm, learning about vegetable production, milk production, horses, and other small animals and agriculture in general. Alfred State Agriculture and Veterinary Technology Department students served as tour guides for the event.

Dr. Phil Schroeder, chair of the department, said Kiddie Ag Day was a great success.

“The weather was beautiful, the kids were awesome, and our students did an outstanding job teaching the children about where their food comes from,” he said.


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