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Mechanical engineering technology students utilizing their talents in three impressive projects

Posted Date: Monday, May 4, 2015 - 11:00

Whether they are increasing energy efficiency or looking to showcase their skills in an international engineering competition, mechanical engineering technology (MET) students have been working hard during the spring semester on some amazing projects.

MET students with their solar-thermal clothing dryer prototypeIn one such venture, students have developed a solar-thermal clothing dryer prototype that uses 90 percent less energy than a traditional dryer and improves drying performance. Jon Owejan, assistant professor of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Technology, said the dryer has a novel energy-recovery system and a solar-thermal heat source.

In order to create the prototype, the students designed two heat exchangers, fabricated parts, and retrofitted an existing dryer.

“These students are taking a real hard look at something that’s in every household and making it a lot more efficient,” said Matthew Lawrence, associate professor of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Technology.

Peter Borglum, of Pittsford, said he is proud to have been involved in this project, which he said shows “such promise” and considerable cost-effectiveness.

“Hopefully the results of our work will spur future MET projects that put the knowledge we have gained into practice,” Borglum said.

Yanmar engineers Yoshinori Jodo, left, and Michael Alfano inspecting the installation of the micro combined heat and power (Micro CHP) systemIn another project, through a collaboration with the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC) and Yanmar Energy Systems, Alfred State has commissioned a micro combined heat and power (Micro CHP) cogeneration system that utilizes a natural gas engine to produce 5 kilowatts of power. As part of his senior project, Luke Miller, of Hornell is helping to install the system, which will become a regular part of the MET teaching curriculum.

According to Owejan, the cogeneration system has a higher efficiency than traditional stand-by generators because it captures the waste heat and re-deploys it for a number of uses, such as domestic hot water, heating pools, radiant heating systems, and more.

“This is a great example of next-generation energy systems the students are being exposed to in the MET program,” he said.

Michael Alfano, sales application engineer at Yanmar, said, “We at Yanmar are pleased to have the opportunity to work in partnership with the students, faculty, and staff of Alfred State on the Yanmar Micro Cogeneration Project. We are excited to introduce micro cogeneration concepts and ideas and assist in facilitating an operational system for the students to observe and learn from.”

MET students have also, for the second consecutive year, designed and fabricated an off-road vehicle for a Baja SAE international engineering competition taking place May 7-10 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The object of the competition, according to bajasaemaryland.umbc.edu, is to provide SAE student members with a challenging project that involves the design, planning, and manufacturing tasks found when introducing a new product to the consumer industrial market.

Baja team with vehicleThis year, the Alfred State vehicle features on-board instrumentation and an advanced suspension. About 15 students will be making the trip to Maryland to compete against approximately 100 other colleges.

Nathan DeMario, of South Wales, said working on the Baja team has had a significant impact on him.

“It has changed my view of my college experience, it has helped me develop a relationship between information gained in class work and applying the information that we have learned, and it has also allowed me to enjoy my college experience more than I ever thought I would,” he said.

Nathan Sheckler, of Phelps, said this year’s Baja vehicle has “made leaps and bounds over last year’s” entry.

“It’s really exciting to see each individual part come together to make something this cool,” Sheckler said. “It will be an amazing opportunity to compete with this car in Maryland, put it through such a rigorous test, and truly see how well it is built.”

Solar-thermal dryer photo: Mechanical engineering technology (MET) students Brian Mothon, of Galway left, and Zach Hale, of Rochester, stand in front of a poster that explains their solar-thermal clothes dryer project. MET students who were also involved but are not pictured are Peter Borglum, of Pittsford; Kyle Smith-Miglorie, of Avon; and Evan Duffy, of Hamburg.

Cogeneration system photo: Shown here are Yanmar engineers Yoshinori Jodo, left, and Michael Alfano inspecting the installation of the micro combined heat and power (Micro CHP) system.

Baja team 2015 photo: Pictured are mechanical engineering technology students and their entry for the Baja SAE international engineering competition taking place May 7-10 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. From left to right, are Jason Walker, of Phelps; Zach Shadbolt, of Attica; Alex Fisher, of Painted Post; Nathan Sheckler, of Phelps; Nathan DeMario, of South Wales, and (kneeling) Eli Bell, of Shinglehouse, PA.


Fifth annual Relay for Life raises more than $23,000 in fight against cancer

Posted Date: Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 15:15

2015 Relay for Life participants

To say that the fifth annual Alfred State Relay for Life event held April 10-11 was a success would be an understatement.

According to Krystal Perlman, campus official and adviser to the student-run Alfred State Relay for Life Planning Committee, this year’s Relay goal of $11,000 was “blown out of the water” by the $23,298 that was raised. A total of 283 people participated as part of 19 teams, far surpassing the planning committee’s goal of 200 participants.

“When I first started planning Alfred State’s first Relay for Life five years ago, we had a very small goal of $5,000 and 100 participants, so to see this year’s event be so successful is just amazing,” said Perlman, Computer Help Desk coordinator at the college.

Tiffany Zimmer, community manager of Relay for Life for the American Cancer Society, said she is “beyond proud” of the passion that Alfred State students “put in toward the fight against cancer.”

“They are the future for the American Cancer Society and with more than doubling their fundraising goal this year, I know the future is in good hands,” Zimmer said. “The money they raised together will help so many of our cancer patients and their families. I’m just beyond proud. No words can express my gratitude for all they have accomplished.”

The 12-hour event, which aims to raise awareness and funds in the fight against cancer, lasted from 6 p.m. April 10 until 6 a.m. April 11 in the Orvis Activities Center gymnasium. The night featured a Disney theme throughout all of its games, activities, “camp sites,” and giveaway prizes.

The committee, Perlman said, can continue fundraising efforts until Aug. 1 and hopes to reach $25,000 by then. So far, Alfred State Relay events have raised more than $60,000 for the American Cancer Society.

“Five years ago, I would never have imagined that we would have such a high level of support and participation that would result in raising more than $60,000 since then for the American Cancer Society,” Perlman said.

Karla Chun, a forensic science technology major from Broadalbin and chair of the planning committee, said the members of the committee she is on are some of the most dedicated and passionate people she has come to know. Chun said she would like to thank all committee members and Perlman and Zimmer for their efforts, as well as everyone who participated in and donated to the event.

“We made a positive difference in people’s lives,” she said, “and that is something to be proud of. Celebrate. Remember. And fight back.”


Seven students inducted into Psi Beta honor society

Posted Date: Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 11:00

Seven students at Alfred State were inducted April 20 into the Psi Beta honor society, an organization that promotes interest in the study of psychology.

Students must have earned a 3.25 (out of a possible 4.0) GPA, including a “B” or higher in at least one psychology course. Those inducted were Alyssa Falcone, a human services management major from Fillmore; Jessica Dixon, a human services management major from Wellsville; Jessica Holden, a liberal arts and sciences: social science major from Ithaca; Charles Lohnes, a liberal arts and sciences: social science major from Belmont; Stephanie Pembleton, a human services management major from Buffalo; Chelsey Pierce, a human services management major from Andover; and Dorothy Billings, a human services major from Wellsville.

The ceremony was conducted by Dr. BJ Douglass, assistant professor in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Department and faculty adviser to the club.

students inducted into Psi Beta honor society 2015

Pictured in photo, from left to right, are Alyssa Falcone, a human services management major from Fillmore; Jessica Dixon, a human services management from Wellsville; Jessica Holden, a liberal arts and sciences: social science major from Ithaca; Charles Lohnes, a liberal arts and sciences: social science major from Belmont; Stephanie Pembleton, Buffalo, human services management major from Buffalo, and Dr. BJ Douglass, faculty adviser. Not pictured are Chelsey Pierce, a human services management major from Andover, and Dorothy Billings, a human services major from Wellsville.


Digital Media and Animation Showcase slated for May 9

Posted Date: Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 09:30

Come take a journey through the world of imagination and witness some amazing student projects Saturday, May 9, when Alfred State hosts the free Digital Media and Animation Showcase.

Beginning at 5 p.m. in the Bret Llewellyn Gallery, located in room 312 of the Engineering Technology Building, will be a visual and interactive extravaganza. This, according to Dennis Dueno, a digital media and animation major from Brooklyn, is a gallery installation that will have two games that the audience can interact with, and will also feature a display of graphic design pieces.

Afterward at 7 p.m. in the Orvis Activities Center will be a showcase of selected works, including 2-D/3-D animation, film, motion graphics, and mixed media, said Kathryn Worth, a digital media and animation major from Corfu. Refreshments will be served at the gallery exhibition and a reception will follow the showcase in Orvis. Formal attire is requested.

All of the work shown is created by digital media and animation students. Worth said the event gives people the chance to learn about the processes students undertake when making their projects.

“Most students I have interacted with don’t know what we do and what is involved in creating a film, animation, or even a graphic on a computer,” she said.

Dueno noted, “Guests will be able to see the kind of work that is produced in the classroom that may be in theaters one day.”


Annual Alfred State Voices spring concert ‘Music Blooms’ to take place April 30

Posted Date: Monday, April 27, 2015 - 16:00

"Music Blooms," the annual spring concert for Alfred State Voices, the college’s own concert choir, will occur at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 30 in the Cappadonia Auditorium in the Orvis Activities Center.

The show will feature a great variety of music, including a Katy Perry tune, Eric Whitacre's "Lux Aurumque," a Jamaican-style spiritual, "Shut De Do," along with several others. A very special piece about Upper Mongolia called "Beautiful Grassland, My Home," will be sung in Chinese. Special guest Daisy Wu from the Confucious Institute at Alfred University will play the guzheng, a Chinese plucked zither.

“This will be a very fine program and we invite all to come and enjoy the music,” said Linda Staiger, Alfred State’s choral director.


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