February 2011

Lady Pioneers Down Wolves

Posted Date: Thursday, February 17, 2011 - 15:05

The Alfred State College women's basketball team used a strong second half to down Niagara CCC 66-59 on Thursday.  The win improves the Lady Pioneers to 13-12 (3-6 RIII DII).

Camille Romero (Queens Village/Mary Louis) led the blue & gold with 22 points while Amie Brooks (Pavilion) added 11 points while Shadeeka Campbell (Brooklyn/William Grady) came off the bench and finished with 11 points and 16 rebounds.  Ardaisha Hudson (Brooklyn/Food & Finance) chipped in seven points and 17 rebounds.

ASC trailed 28-26 at the half but shot 40.6% in the second half to take control of the contest.  The Pioneers grabbed 29 offensive rebounds and had a 60 to 51 overall advantage on the boards.

Karissa Dolney led NCCC with 14 points while Jasmine Shabazz finished with eight points and 15 rebounds.

The Lady Pioneers close out the regular season on Saturday when they host Genesee CC at 1 p.m.

 


Pioneers Can't Rally Back

Posted Date: Thursday, February 17, 2011 - 16:49

The Alfred State College men's basketball team couldn't rally all the way back from an 18-point deficit and fell 84-74 to Niagara CCC in their final road contest of the season.  NCCC improves to 19-8 on the year.

Robbie Seyler led the Thunder Wolves with 32 points on 11 for 15 shooting.  AJ Roberts finished with a double-double with 17 points and 10 boards while Lorenzo Joseph chipped in 13.

Younatan Gobezai (Bethesda, MD) led the Pioneers with 26 points (5 three-pointers).  Milton Colquehoun (Silver Springs, MD) came off the bench and netted 18 points while Patrick Parker (Jamaica/Hillcrest) chipped in 14.  Vince Antonioli (Wellsville) had eight points.

The Pioneers trailed 39-24 at half and trailed by as many as 18-points in the second half before mounting a huge comeback.  ASC cut the deficit to just one 52-51 with just under ten minutes left but could never take the lead.

The blue & gold close out the 2010-11 season on Saturday when they host Genesee CC at 3 p.m.


Students Preparing for Northeast Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition

Posted Date: Friday, February 18, 2011 - 07:26

Twelve students enrolled in Alfred State College’s Computer and Information Technology bachelor degree programs are preparing to compete at the 2011 Northeast Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition at Northeastern University, Boston, MA. Eight of the 12 will compete at the event March 4 -6. The Alfred State College Cyber Defense team consists of the following members: Michael Romano, Middletown, team captain; Franklin Herrneckar, Andover, team liaison; Benjamin Andrews, Harpursville; Timothy Gonzalez, Norwich; Shane Canaski, Arcade; Joshua Fechter, Corfu; Roosevelt Marthel, Brooklyn; Matthew Merriam, Friendship; Adam Schraner, Ronkonkoma; Michael Starr, Tonawanda; Adam Worth, Pembroke; and Amelio Wright, Arcade.

Including Alfred State College, 11 colleges will be competing at this year’s event. The competitors include some the best universities in the Northeast, including Northeastern University, University of Maine, Champlain College, Harvard University, University of New Hampshire, Stevens Institute of Technology, UMass Boston, RIT, Pace University (NY), and Polytechnic Institute of NYU.

The three-day event will commence on Friday, March 4, where the competition occurs from 1:30-7 p.m.; the following day, competition begins at 9 a.m. until 7 p.m.; and on Sunday, competition lasts from 9 a.m.-12 noon. An awards ceremony will follow at 3 p.m.

The competition requires each of the student teams, known as BLUE teams, to secure the various unsecured enterprises assigned to them. Each enterprise is identical for all teams and consists of a number of computers and network appliances. A RED team of computer security experts from academia and industry begin attacking the BLUE teams by exploiting network vulnerabilities immediately when the teams enter their network room. The RED team reports all vulnerabilities to the WHITE team. The WHITE team consists of the competition judges and scorers. A BLACK team is responsible setting up the computer networks before the competition begins.

During the competition, the WHITE team 'injects' requirements into the workflow of the BLUE teams. All BLUE teams receive the same 'injects' at the same time. 'Injects' can be of any type, from requiring a report to management, to removing one or more team members, to changing the requirements of the enterprise. To win the competition, a BLUE team must be able to balance service-level responsibilities with external attacks and internal demand.

The Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (CCDC) provides institutions that offer an information assurance or computer security curriculum a controlled, competitive environment to assess their students’ depth of understanding and operational competency in managing the challenges inherent in protecting a corporate network infrastructure and business information systems.

The competition tests each student team’s ability to secure networked computer systems while maintaining standard business functionality. The scenario involves team members simulating a group of new employees that have been brought in to manage and protect the IT infrastructure at a small to medium sized IT services company/reseller. The teams are expected to manage the computer network, keep it operational, and control/prevent any unauthorized access. Each team will be expected to maintain and provide public services: a Web site, an e-mail server, a database server, an application server, and workstations used by simulated sales, marketing, and research staff.

The NECCDC is primarily an undergraduate student competition. Teams are comprised of six-eight people; at most, two of these may be graduate students.

Winner of this competition will move on to the 2011 National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition in San Antonio, TX.


ASC Regional Science and Technology Fair, March 25

Posted Date: Friday, February 18, 2011 - 10:07

The 12th annual Alfred State College Regional Science and Technology Fair will be held Friday, March 25, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Orvis Activities Center gymnasium on the Alfred campus.

Science and Technology Fair entries from regional junior and senior high school students will be judged in the following categories: agriculture, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, computers, earth sciences, engineering, environmental science, forensic science, health, and medicine. Entries will be divided into junior (grades 7-9), senior (10-12), and novice (4-6) categories.

Each participant will receive a certificate of participation, and individual ribbons will be presented to first, second, and third prize winners in all divisions as well as to the grand prize winner. School trophies will be awarded to those schools which, in the opinion of the judges, have made the best overall contribution(s) to the Fair in the junior and senior divisions and to the school having the grand prize exhibit in the Fair. First, second, and third prizes will be awarded in both upper divisions; a grand prize will also be awarded.

Alstom Transportation, Hornell, is sponsoring this year’s Science Fair at Alfred State. Additional funding is provided by ACES (Auxiliary Campus Enterprises and Services—the campus dining, vending, and transportation provider) and Alfred State Student Senate.

Interested students may e-mail Amy Werner at werneral@alfredstate.edu, or visit the science fair Web page.


ASC to Host Third Annual Technology Challenge

Posted Date: Friday, February 18, 2011 - 10:36

Alfred State College will host the third annual Technology Challenge, Friday, March 25, 2011, from 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Orvis Activities Center on the Alfred campus.

The competition is technically a two-day event intended to provide an opportunity for high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors to showcase their technology and business skills. The competition includes three aspects: --the design and construction of a solar oven; --the redesign and construction of a robot; and --the production of a business plan for system.

The technology component of the project will consist of solar oven design and construction, robot design and construction, and a baking task. The business component of the project will be a business plan for the device (i.e., company name, mission statement, marketing materials, etc.).

On Feb. 10, the all-female teams, per a Carl D. Perkins grant, and faculty from each school visited the Alfred State College Wellsville campus to receive the design kits, competition regulations, and judging criteria.

On March 25, up to 12 teams and their faculty will reconvene at the Alfred State College campus in Alfred to showcase their creations. The 2011 participating schools include Wildwood BOCES #1; Wildwood BOCES #2; Buffalo City Schools; Rush-Henrietta #1; Rush-Henrietta #2; Prattsburgh Central; Portville Central; Genesee Valley Central; Rochester City Schools; Hinsdale Central; Williamson High School #1; and Williamson #2.

Alfred State College robotics students will help referee the contest while competitors’ business plans will be judged by Alfred State College senior Business Department students. Plaques will be provided for first-, second-, and third-place teams.

Lunch for participants and their advisers will be provided by ACES.

Other support was provided by the ASC Schools of Applied Technology and Management and Engineering Technology and by a gender equity grant under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act Amendments of 1990 administered by the NYS Education Department.


Nursing Dept. Continues “Pay It Forward” Philosophy

Posted Date: Friday, February 18, 2011 - 11:02

Panter, right, presents Babcock with the scholarship.The Alfred State College Nursing Department continued its “Pay It Forward” philosophy through the awarding of its fifth annual round of “Pay It Forward” scholarships, established during the fall 2006 semester and presented to this year’s recipient, senior nursing student Laura Babcock, Wellsville.

The premise of “paying it forward” comes from a movie by the same name where a school child, as the result of a homework assignment to change the world, begins the practice of helping others, expecting not pay back, but that each of those beneficiaries will go on to help three more people. The caring aspect of that concept prompted Linda Panter, ASC professor in the nursing program, to incorporate it into the program, where it has grown, and culminated, thus far, into the scholarship. Each eligible nursing student submits proposals detailing the activities they could conduct to demonstrate the caring nature of the profession. The proposals need to demonstrate an understanding of caring as identified in the nursing caring project and evidenced by implementing a unique caring project and revealing insight and sensitivity in the written assignment.

The Pay It Forward concept developed into a Pay It Forward Scholarship, initiated by the nursing graduating Class of 2005. The scholarships are awarded to senior nursing students at the beginning of their last semester. Funding is provided by private donors as well as through fundraisers conducted by the nursing students themselves.

“’Pay It Forward’ is a concept relating to social change beginning with the individual. Application of the process results in exponential development of moral health and caring, as well as transformation of the individual into a contributing member of the global society,” says Panter of the project. She adds, “The selection of the recipient is based on whether the project demonstrates an understanding of caring as evidenced by implementing a unique caring project and revealing insight and sensitivity in the written assignment.”

Babcock’s project, in part, read:

“To me, caring is an act of kindness done for another person. Whether it is showing concern, doing a good deed, or being sensitive and empathetic toward another’s feelings, both the person giving and receiving care should experience [a] loving feeling. Without a doubt, caring is putting someone else’s needs first; it’s helping someone out even when there may be a million other projects to be done.

“[During] my senior year in high school, I shoveled a walk-way for an older couple, Mr. and Mrs. L, who live nearby, during the winter so the wife could maneuver her walker without interference. So I called them up, explained my intentions, and Mr. L told me to come over.

“When I drove over to their house, Mr. L looked beat. He told me that his wife was having some difficulty and I immediately felt concerned. I asked if there was anything I could do to help. He went back inside and handed me a grocery list and money, and I went shopping.

“When I returned, his son answered the door; he was visiting from Georgia for Thanksgiving. He led me inside where Mr. L proceeded to sit down at the kitchen table and talk to me. From my phone conversation with him earlier he knew that I was a nursing student and that was enough for him to open up to me about his wife. She had diabetes and a lot of edema in her lower extremities. She was also having kidney failure. When I heard her talk, she sounded very gravelly. He talked at length about her condition and how worried he was, because he’s 93 and couldn’t really take care of her anymore the way he wants to, and I sat there and listened.

“After our conversation, I asked Mr. L if there was anything else I could help them with; he said that I could take the dead leaves off of the bush in front of the picture window and dump them in the backyard. After I unloaded them, I turned around only to be startled by his son. He told me that he was so thankful for what I had done, and even though I don’t necessarily think what I did was that significant, I know that it’s the little things in life that count. I told him about the Pay It Forward project and that I didn’t expect his parents to be able to “pay it forward” to someone else, but I just wanted to do a good deed for them. He choked up when he answered, ‘Yes, but I will.’ I knew right then that what I had done had made a difference. And I felt pleased that he would carry on an act of kindness to someone else.”


Pioneers Finish 2nd at Indoor Regionals

Posted Date: Friday, February 18, 2011 - 18:03

Both the Alfred State College men's and women's indoor track & field teams finished 2nd at the Region III Championships.  The Region III Championships were held in conjunction with the RIT Orange and Brown Invitational.

On the women's side, Tara Murphy (Rochester/Wilson) was a two-event winner.  She won the 400 m (61.53) and the 800 m (2:27.96).  Tara Noble (Rochester/John Marshall) won the 55 m dash (7.69) while Briana Dorsey (Rochester/School of the Arts) won the 200 (27.46).  The 4 x 400 relay team broke the ASC record and also claimed the regional title with a run of 4:11.15.

Brett Harrington (Rochester/Edison) won two events on the men's side.  He ran a 7.64 to win the 55 hurdles and a 6.59 to win the 55 m dash.  Rawle Crawford (Mt. Vernon) won the 200 (23.26), Ken Boyer (Albion) won the 400 (51.15), and Isiah Whiting (Hamden, CT) won the 800 (1:59.57).  Whiting's performance qualified him for the NJCAA National Championships.

Marquis Johnson-Broughton (Rochester/Edison) also qualifed for the national championships with a 2nd place finish in the 500 (67.75).

In field events, Tyree Constantine (Binghamton) won the high jump (1.88 m), David Miller (Elmira Southside) won the pole vault (4.55 m), and Byron Jones (Niagara Falls) won the triple jump (14.08).

Mohawk Valley CC won the women's regional title with 200 points.  ASC finished with 122 and SUNY Delhi 120.

On the men's side Delhi took the crown with 199.6 points followed by ASC's 190.6 and MVCC's 178.6.

 


Lady Cougars Rally for Victory

Posted Date: Sunday, February 20, 2011 - 02:51

Genesee CC used an 18-8 run late in the second half en route to a 70-62 victory over Alfred State in the regular season finale for both teams.  GCC finishes with a 16-10 (9-1 RIII DII) mark while ASC is 13-13 (3-7).

The Lady Pioneers led 38-31 with 12:28 remaining but GCC rallied and tied the game at 48-48 with 6:29 remaining.  The Cougars went on the deciding run and never looked back.

Camille Romero (Queens Village/Mary Louis) and Corrine Wright (Campbell Savona) each finished with 14 points to pace the Lady Pioneers.  Amie Brooks (Pavilion) chipped in 12 points and seven assists while Nuri Bey (Bronx/Evander Childs) had six points and 12 rebounds.

Jasmine Armstead led GCC with 15 points and eight boards while De’Yara Burrell finished with 13.  Shakatta Brown added 12 points and seven rebounds.

Both teams shot poorly in the first half but heated up in the second half.  ASC shot 53.3% from the field in the second and 80% from the foul line while GCC shot 42.9% from the field and 66.7% from the line.  The Cougars held a 54 to 48 advantage on the boards and forced ASC into 18 turnovers.

ASC will host a Region III Division II Tournament First Round contest on Wednesday evening.  The Lady Pioneers most likely will be the #4 seed and host #5 Niagara CCC.  Times and opponents will officially be announced on Monday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genesee CC used an 18-8 run late in the second half en route to a 70-62 victory over Alfred State in the regular season finale for both teams.  GCC finishes with a 16-10 (9-1 RIII DII) mark while ASC is 13-13 (3-7).

 

The Lady Pioneers led 38-31 with 12:28 remaining but GCC rallied and tied the game at 48-48 with 6:29 remaining.  The Cougars went on the deciding run and never looked back.

 

Camille Romero (Queens Village/Mary Louis) and Corrine Wright (Campbell Savona) each finished with 14 points to pace the Lady Pioneers.  Amie Brooks (Pavilion) chipped in 12 points and seven assists while Nuri Bey (Bronx/Evander Childs) had six points and 12 rebounds.

 

Jasmine Armstead led GCC with 15 points and eight boards while De’Yara Burrell finished with 13.  Shakatta Brown added 12 points and seven rebounds.

 

Both teams shot poorly in the first half but heated up in the second half.  ASC shot 53.3% from the field in the second and 80% from the foul line while GCC shot 42.9% from the field and 66.7% from the line.  The Cougars held a 54 to 48 advantage on the boards and forced ASC into 18 turnovers.

 

ASC will host a Region III Division II Tournament First Round contest on Wednesday evening.  The Lady Pioneers most likely will be the #4 seed and host #5 Niagara CCC.  Times and opponents will officially be announced on Monday.


Strong Start to Second Half Leads Cougars

Posted Date: Sunday, February 20, 2011 - 02:53

Genesee CC started the second half on an 18-0 run and increased their three-point halftime lead to 21 en route to a 72-59 victory.  GCC heads into the postseason with an 18-11 mark while the Pioneers conclude their season at 5-23.

Terrell Rankin led all scorers with 26 points while Demetrius Beauford recorded a double-double with 10 points and 12 rebounds.  GCC held a 50 to 37 advantage on the boards and forced ASC into 21 turnovers.

Patrick Parker (Jamaica/Hillcrest) came off the bench and led the blue & gold with 14 points, 10 rebounds, and six assists.  Younatan Gobezai (Washington, DC) netted 12 in his final game at Alfred State while Melvin Jenkins (Brooklyn/Susan McKinney) finished with nine.  ASC shot 36.8% from the field, 27.8% from three, and just 57.1% from the foul line.


ASC Earns #4 Seed

Posted Date: Monday, February 21, 2011 - 08:40

The Alfred State College women's basketball team has earned the #4 seed in the Region III Division II Tournament and will host #5 Niagara CCC in a first round contest on Wednesday at 6 p.m.  The Lady Pioneers are 3-7 in region play while the Thunder Wolves are 2-8.

This will be the third meeting between the two schools.  ASC down NCCC 71-66 at the Orvis Activities Center on 1/29 and then earned a 66-59 victory last week in Sanborn.

The Lady Pioneers are led by the guard duo of Amie Brooks (Pavilion) and Camille Romero (Queens Village).  Brooks is averaging 12 points per game and 3.2 rebounds while Romero is tallying 11 points per game and 4.0 boards.  Underneath the boards, Shadeeka Campbell (Brooklyn/William Grady) leads the team with 10.8 rebounds per game and Nuri Bey (Bronx/Evander Childs) is averaging 9.8 rebounds.

The winner of this first round match-up will take on #1 seed Genesee CC (9-1 RIII DII) in the semifinals on Saturday afternoon at 1 p.m. in Batavia.

In the other first round game on Wednesday, #6 Erie CC will travel to #3 Mercyhurst North East.  The winner of that contest takes on #2 Jamestown CC at 3 p.m. on Saturday.  The winners of the semifinals meet at 1 p.m. on Sunday to determine the Region III Division II Champion.


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