1-800-4-ALFRED (425-3733)

Architecture and Design

Livonia resident receives scholarship

Posted Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 12:00

Brandon Holley, center, at awards ceremonyBrandon Holley, of Livonia, was awarded the 2015 Thomas Wurzer Memorial Scholarship at the January meeting of the Rochester chapter of the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) at the Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester.

Holley is a third-year architecture student enrolled in the Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) program at Alfred State, and a member of the school’s soccer team, which he led in scoring last year.

The purpose of the scholarship is to recognize a deserving student in an architectural, engineering, or constructional technology program, based on merit and by intent to aspire to a career in the design or construction profession.

From left to right are Kenneth Christiano, CSI, CDT, of SWBR Architects and president of CSI Rochester; Brandon Holley, Bachelor of Architecture, Livonia; and Jessica Kruse, CSI, CDT, LEED GA, LaBella Associates and education chair of CSI Rochester.


Architecture students present course work to industry professionals

Posted Date: Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 10:00

student Nicholas Galatioto of Garwood, NJ, presenting his fifth-year thesis proposalSix fifth-year architecture students in Alfred State’s first-ever Bachelor of Architecture class presented progress drawings and models to industry professionals as part of their Design Studio 7 – Thesis Definition course work late last semester.

The presentations built on previously completed work that included developing a thesis abstract and performance program for their proposed projects, and an illustrated site exploration of a chosen site. Each student discussed project proposals in terms of their initial research and inspiration, site analysis, conceptual development, and schematic design alternatives. Project proposals ranged from a lacrosse stadium on Long Island, to a municipal complex in Geneseo, to a church in Brasilia, Brazil.

The students presented their thesis proposals to a design jury that included Leticia Fornataro, associate AIA, of SWBR Architects; Bud Knapp, AIA, of Nehemiah Design; and Professors Sue Akiyama; Richard Carlo, AIA; and William Dean, AIA, the course’s instructor. This was the second time that Fornataro and Knapp provided valuable feedback to the students on their work in progress. Akiyama is the students’ instructor for the second part of the capstone project, Design Studio 8 – Thesis Definition, currently taking place this semester.

The mission of the Department of Architecture and Design is to provide a career-focused, project-based education, integrating theory and practice with a strong multidisciplinary foundation that draws upon an institutional heritage of building and technology. Emphasizing core values of leadership, professional preparedness, and work ethic, experienced faculty offer personal instruction and guidance to students as they collaborate with real people to explore real challenges across the region and beyond.

The department offers four degrees; an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in interior design, an AAS in architectural technology, a Bachelor of Science (BS) in architectural technology, and SUNY’s first five-year Bachelor of Architecture (BArch). The emphasis on all programs in the department is to create good design for the social good.

In photo from left to right are Alfred State Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) student Nicholas Galatioto of Garwood, NJ, presenting his fifth-year thesis proposal to Leticia Fornataro, associate AIA, of SWBR Architects; Alfred State Professor Sue Akiyama; and Bud Knapp, AIA, of Nehemiah Design.


Architecture students present at ATP Conference in Washington

Posted Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 11:15

senior architecture students with Professor William Dean and ; Dr. Craig Clark Eight senior architecture students presented at the annual Appalachian Teaching Project (ATP) conference at the end of the fall semester in Washington, DC.

The presentation centered on a project the students undertook last semester as part of Design Studio 5: Urban Design, in which they worked closely with residents and community leaders in the Chemung County town of Southport. The students produced a community visualization study to create a vision for the sustainability and growth of Southport, which was well received by residents and village officials and may be considered for future implementation.

In addition to the final presentation, the nine-week project also included the completion of a Neighborhood Development Analysis to familiarize students with the town, a meeting with town officials midway through the project, and a public display of the student work at the Community Design Center gallery in Downtown Rochester.

Led by the Consortium of Appalachian Centers and Institutes, the ATP offers students a unique opportunity to conduct active community-based research on their campuses.

Pictured in photo from left to right are Professor William Dean, Department of Architecture and Design (ATP Teaching Fellow); Eric Lipes, of Cicero; Andrew Scott, of Queens; Serif Hajdarevic, of East Syracuse; Shane Joyce, of Irondequoit; Elizabeth Deuell, of South Wales; Stacy Duink, of Hamburg; Clayton Lounsbery, of Liverpool; Dr. Craig Clark, Alfred State vice president of Economic Development (ATP Teaching Fellow); ARC Federal Co-Chair Earl F. Gohl; and Kodie Tompkins, of Savannah. Duink is a Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) major, and Lipes, Scott, Hajdarevic, Joyce, Deuell, Lounsbery, and Tompkins are all architectural technology majors.


Students present Community Visualization Study for town of Southport

Posted Date: Monday, November 16, 2015 - 15:00

architecture students who presented to town of SouthportThe town of Southport received some assistance with envisioning its recently approved comprehensive plan after Alfred State architecture students presented their designs that looked five, 10, and 15 years into the future development of the municipality. The presentation took place Nov. 11 at the Southport Fire Hall.

Town officials and more than 25 residents listened as 12 students in Professor William Dean’s Urban Design Studio shared their Community Visualization Study for five sections of Southport. The study included two areas in Center Southport along Broadway Street, Southtown Plaza on Cedar Street, and residential areas in the Lower Mt. Zoar and Universal Village districts.

Individual proposals from the students involved placing a new pedestrian bridge over Route 14 that would connect the bulkhead to a walking trail along Seeley Creek, a new community center in Center Southport, infill housing to serve people in a range of income levels and age groups, and general improvements that would make Southport safer for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Dean, a professor of Architecture and Design, said the goal was to illustrate the great work done by the town in developing its comprehensive plan, and show how Southport could be transformed over the next 15 years from a thoroughfare that people pass through on their way to and from Elmira, to a true destination that builds on its location as a gateway to the Southern Tier.

“We tried to remain as faithful to that document as possible,” he said. “Students were encouraged to bring their own design experience to the project, but I kept driving home the point that we wanted our work to be an extension of the comprehensive plan.”

The students spent nine weeks on the project, which began in August with a tour of the town led by Supervisor David Sheen, and included the completion of a Neighborhood Development Analysis to study the existing conditions, and an interim critique by a panel composed of Sheen; Deputy Supervisor Kathy Szerszen; and Nicolette Barber, a planner from HUNT Engineers, Architects and Surveyors out of Horseheads. The students took those comments to heart and continued to develop their designs for the final presentation.

According to Dean, the students’ designs were given a lot of positive feedback throughout the process and were well-received during the presentation.

In photo above, from left to right are Alfred State students Chiharu Kamioka, of Tochigi, Japan; Eric Lipes, of Cicero; Clayton Lounsbery of Liverpool; Beth Parker of Campbell; Shane Joyce of Irondequoit; Liz Deuell of South Wales; Kodie Tompkins of Savannah; Andrew Scott of Arverne; Serif Hajdarevic of East Syracuse; Brady Morrison of Kennedy; Jayson Perrine of Syracuse; and Stacy Duink of Hamburg. All are architectural technology majors except Duink and Parker, who are Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) majors.


Architecture students working on design for Andover Volunteer Emergency Ambulance Corporation building

Posted Date: Friday, May 8, 2015 - 08:30

Under the direction of Professors William Akiyama, Richard Carlo, and William Dean, some architecture students have been working on a civic engagement project involving the design of a Volunteer Emergency Ambulance Corporation (AVAC) facility for the village of Andover.

Taylor Chapman, an architectural technology major from Hamburg, and Roberto Trujillo, an architecture student from Jackson Heights, present their schematic designsOn April 1, the students and faculty met with members of the ambulance corporation at the existing fire station in Andover. Students had prepared questions to assist them in better understanding the problems involved with the ambulance corporation sharing the fire station facility.

“This meeting also assisted the students in developing additional program information,” Carlo said. “Afterward, students were provided with a tour of the facilities, equipment, and processes of the corporation.”

The group also toured the proposed site of the new building, located directly adjacent to the fire station. Students collected on-site photos and other observations that assisted them in the preparation of a site analysis and the subsequent schematic designs.

On April 15, students presented their schematic designs to the members of the Andover Emergency Ambulance Corporation, including Chief Kelly Padden; Kevin Waters; Thomas Kent, president of the board; Kathleen Kent, board member; and Ken Gray, vice president.

“The students presented six of more than 20 options generated to give an overview of the possible approches to the design,” Carlo said. “The guests were very impressed with the students’ work and are looking forward to the future design development of the project.”

Carlo said the students intend to have a final design presentation and collate all the solutions into a design booklet.

“This will hopfully aid the AVAC in establishing priorities of the project and aquiring possible grant money to realize the facility,” he said.

Students will give their final presentations to members of the AVAC from 3-6 p.m. Wednesday, May 13, in rooms 417 and 424 of the Engineering Technology Building.


Pages