Veterinary Technology (AAS)

Application Code: 
0521
Degree Received: 
Associate in Applied Science (AAS)
Academic Department Info: 
Program Coordinator: 
Dr. Melvin Chambliss
Coordinator Email: 
chamblm@alfredstate.edu
Description: 

360 Virtual TourThe veterinary technology program is designed to provide students extensive core information in the theory and principles of veterinary science. The core information is then reinforced with the hands-on technical, animal, and laboratory experiences needed to prepare them to become licensed veterinary technicians. Licensed veterinary technicians are indispensable members of the veterinary medical team who are compassionate and highly motivated professionals dedicated to animal health care. The veterinary technician is capable of providing nursing care, life support, laboratory specimen analysis, physical therapy, surgical assistance, anesthesia, dental hygiene, radiographic imaging, and nutritional management for their animal patients. The veterinary technician is also adept at client education and grief management counseling.

The veterinary technology program is primarily housed on the third floor of the Agriculture Science Building. In the Agriculture Building, a vivarium houses mice, rats, snakes, lizards, tortoises, turtles, birds, rabbits, and guinea pigs; you will also find cat kennels, dog kennels, laboratories for teaching animal health care, animal anatomy and physiology, anatomy/necropsy, parasitology, laboratory animal management and exotics, surgical suites, medical imaging suites, pharmacy, animal examination rooms, and a clinical pathology laboratory. Large animal laboratories are conducted at the Alfred State Farm. Students learn to safely work with and care for a variety of farm animals including horses, pigs, sheep, goats, alpacas, and dairy cattle of all ages.

An average week consists of 24-36 hours spent in the classroom and/or laboratories. Veterinary technology blends hands-on techniques with lecture-based course materials. Students are assigned an adviser from within the program to assist with career and academic planning.

Veterinary technology students are encouraged to become members of the student chapter of the NYSAVT (New York State Association of Veterinary Technicians), and NAVTA (National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America).

The veterinary technology program is designed to be completed in two academic years. Students enrolled as Alfred State Opportunities Program students have three academic years to complete the program. Transfer students with appropriate advanced degrees or transfer students from other veterinary technology programs may be eligible for advanced placement. In order to progress in the veterinary technology program, students must earn a "C" or better in each core veterinary technology course, with the exception of VETS 1214 large animal anatomy and physiology which requires a minimum of a "D" to pass the course. Students receiving an "F" in two or more successive core veterinary technology courses will be required to change majors.

Expenses

Rabies vaccinations are recommended for all veterinary technology students. The vaccination series cost varies between $600 and $800. Textbooks are the primary annual expense with cost averaging $1,000 to $1,200 each year.

Student Learning Outcomes: 
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of Anatomy & Physiology and Pathophysiology which will allow them to successfully and safely perform animal care and husbandry, physical examinations, restraint techniques, clinical imaging procedures, general anesthetic protocols, and clinical diagnostic testing procedures for all common domestic, laboratory and exotic animals handled in the program.
  • Demonstrate verbal, written, computer skills and critical thinking skills suitable to provide accurate client communication information and accurately complete all forms of medical records handled within the program.
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze information, and compare and contrast agricultural management systems.
  • Accurately calculate common drug dose regimens and fluid administration rates and safely administer them for all common domestic, laboratory and exotic animals handled in the program.
  • Info Management (computer & research skills appropriate to degree level and type)
  • Written & Oral Communication (appropriate to degree level and type)
  • Critical Thinking (problem solving, reasoning skills appropriate to degree level and type)
Entrance Requirements & Recommendations: 

Required: Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2/ Trigonometry, Biology, Chemistry
Recommended: Physics

Accreditation/Certification: 

The veterinary technology program at Alfred State is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities, Education and Research Division, [1931 N. Meacham Road, Suite 100, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4360; 847-925-8070].

The veterinary technology program at Alfred State is a two-year educational course of study leading to an Associate in Applied Science degree and students are eligible to sit for the Veterinary Technology National Exam (VTNE). The VTNE is the New York state licensing exam for veterinary technicians. The demand for graduate-licensed or license-eligible veterinary technicians is strong across the country.

Features & Facilities: 
  • Designed to offer students extensive hands-on experience which reinforces classroom theory and principles
  • Built on AVMA standards
  • Anatomy laboratory
  • Animal and anatomy/necropsy wet lab
  • Surgical nursing-anesthesia/radiology complex
  • Clinical laboratory techniques
  • Alfred State Farm facility
Graduation Requirements: 

Students must:

  • successfully complete the prescribed sequence of courses
  • achieve a minimum of 2.0 in their core courses
  • achieve a minimum of 2.0 overall
  • be recommended by the department faculty

The Admissions and Performance Standards discussed below define performance expectations that must be met for successful completion of the veterinary technology program at Alfred State. It is the policy of Alfred State to provide reasonable accommodations for those with disabilities as defined under the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you need an accommodation due to a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please contact the Student Success Center office at 607-587-4122. Some accommodations may require up to six weeks to prepare. For progression in the veterinary technology program, students are expected to meet the following performance standards:

  • Critical Thinking - Critical thinking sufficient for clinical judgment. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Identify cause-effect relationships in clinical situations. Develop nursing care plans. Demonstrate problem solving skills. Adapt to stressful situations.
  • Interpersonal - Interpersonal abilities sufficient to interact with patients, clients, families &groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural & intellectual backgrounds. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Establish rapport with patients/clients & colleagues. Recognize appropriate boundaries in relationships with patients/clients & colleagues.
  • Communication - Communication abilities for interaction with others orally & in writing. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Explain treatment procedures, initiate health teaching, document & interpret nursing actions and patient/client responses. Team building skills.
  • Mobility - Physical abilities sufficient to move from room to room, maneuver in small spaces & provide assistance to patients. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Move around in patient & treatment areas. Administer CPR. Provide physical assistance to clients & colleagues to ensure safety within the environment. Ability to prevent or escape injury caused by animals (e.g., biting, kicking, stampeding)
  • Motor Skills - Gross & fine motor abilities sufficient to provide safe, effective nursing care in a timely manner. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Use of instruments, supplies, safety devices and communication equipment in the care of patients. Performance of nursing care, surgical assistance, & laboratory techniques.
  • Hearing - Auditory ability sufficient to monitor and assess health needs. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Auditory ability sufficient to hear ausculatory sounds, monitor alarms, monitor and assess health emergency signals, and cries for help. Hear needs. warning sounds from animals and humans of impending danger/injury.
  • Visual - Visual ability sufficient for observation and assessment necessary in nursing care. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Observe patients for expected and unexpected physical and emotional responses to nursing and medical treatment regimens. Use of diagnostic equipment such as a microscope, thermometer, refractometer, etc ...
  • Tactile - Tactile ability sufficient for physical assessment and to perform nursing duties in a timely manner. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Perform palpation functions of physical exam. Administer oral, intramuscular, subcutaneous, & intravenous medications. Insert and remove tubes and perform wound care management. Surgical assistance.
  • Physical Condition - Physical ability and stamina sufficient to restrain, lift, & assist in the care of a variety of species of animals. Ability to stand for extended periods of time. Ability to withstand extreme weather conditions. Immune system competence. Some examples of necessary activities (not all-inclusive): Safely lift, position, and restrain animals and supplies for treatment. Surgical assistance. Daily clinical routine. Year round treatment and care of outdoor animals. Exposure to a wide range of chemical and biological agents.
Career Opportunities: 
  • Veterinary Hospitals (Small Animal, Large Animal, Mixed Animal and Exotic Animal)
  • Biomedical Research Institutions
  • Zoological Parks
  • Educational Institutions
  • Specialized Dairy Calf or Cow Management
Direct Entry Into Baccalaureate Degree Program: 

Alfred State veterinary technology graduates may enter directly into the technology management BBA degree program.

Transfer Opportunities: 

The Alfred State veterinary technology program has an established transfer agreement with Cornell University's College of Agriculture. Students have also successfully transferred into the Purdue University BS veterinary technology program.

Typical Semester Layout: 

An average week consists of 24-36 hours spent in the classroom and/or laboratories. Veterinary technology blends hands-on techniques with lecture-based course materials, with a hands-on emphasis. Students will be assigned an adviser from within the program to assist with career and academic planning.

First Semestercredits
VETS1203Intro to Vet Technology3
VETS1214A & P of Large Animal4
MATH1033College Algebra OR 
MATH1323Quantitative Reasoning3
CHEM1114General Chemistry I4
ANSC1204Intro to Animal Science OR 
VETS3204Farm Animal Management OR 
COMP1503Freshman Composition3-4
   17-18
Second Semestercredits
 xxxxGen Education Elective3
ANSC1204Intro to Animal Science OR 
VETS3204Farm Animal Management OR 
COMP1503Freshman Composition3-4
VETS2014A&P Small Animal4
VETS3003Animal Health Care3
VETS3013Animal Parasitology3
   16-17
Summer Session
Preceptorship Work Experience
Third Semestercredits
VETS4103Lab Animal Management3
VETS3023Radiography3
BIOL5254Principles of Microbiology4
VETS2013Pathophysiology of Animal Disease3
ANSC3013Animal Disease Control3
   16
Fourth Semestercredits
 xxx3Gen Education Elective3
VETS3004Anesthesia & Surgical Nursing4
VETS3024Clinical Lab Techniques4
 xxxxTechnical Elective2-3
BUAD3153Fundamentals of Management3
   16-17

* Students planning to transfer to four-year program must take MATH 1033.

Suggested Technical Electives

  • General Chemistry II
  • Genetics
  • Dairy Calf Management
  • Dairy I
  • Dairy III
  • Reproduction and AI
  • Large Animal Nutrition
  • Small Animal Nutrition
  • General Biology I
  • General Biology II
  • Pharmacology for Verterinary Technicians
  • Advanced Animal Health Care
  • Large Animal Nutrition
  • Livestock Management
  • Precalculus
  • Calculus
  • Statistics

Full-time students can cross register at AU for equestrian classes.

Also required: One unit of physical education.

Preceptorship of 240 hours. Either during summer or semester break after successful completionof second semester course requirements. Preceptorship hours can be fulfilled through part-time employment at an appropriate facility.

ASOP students must earn a C or better in the Introduction to Veterinary Technology course and earn a B or better in the Domestic Animal Anatomy and Physiology course in order to progress to the next level of core veterinary courses.

Employment and Transfer Rate: 
100%
Employment and Transfer Survey Details: 
Survey Details201020112012
Receiving Degrees273135
Responding to Survey21 (78%)23 (74%)21 (60%)
Employed16 (76%)13 (57%)13 (62%)
Employed in Field13 (81%)13 (100%)12 (92%)
Transferred5 (24%)10 (43%)8 (38%)
Unemployed & Seeking Employment------
Unemployed & Not Seeking Employment------
Employment and Transfer Salary Information: 

Less than $20,000 (1)
$20,000 - $29,999 (4)
$30,000 - $39,999 (1)
Prefer not to disclose (7)