ELET - Electrical Engineering Technology

Alfred State courses are grouped into the following sections:

  • An examination of strategies for success, including organizational and study skills, and transfer and career opportunities for engineering students in industry.

  • This course provides an introduction to computer hardware and troubleshooting and an introduction to operating systems. It serves as a foundation for the computer/electronic technician to build on. The knowledge and skills obtained in this course will prepare the student for the CompTIA A+ Certified Computer Technician Hardware and Operating Systems exams.

  • This course provides an introduction to computer hardware and troubleshooting and an introduction to operating systems. It serves as a foundation for the electronic technician to build on. The knowledge and skills obtained in this course will prepare the student for the CompTIA A+ Certified Computer Technician exam.
  • In circuit theory, a student will analyze electrical circuits according to the fundamental definitions and laws as they apply to direct current circuits. The physical parameters defined include charge, voltage, current, resistance, capacitance and inductance. The laws applied include Ohm's Law, Joule's Law, Kirchhoff's Voltage Law, and Kirchhoff's Current Law. The analysis relies on algebra and exponentials. A required recitation is included as a group problem solving session.

  • In circuit theory, a student will analyze electrical circuits according to the fundamental definitions and laws as they apply to direct current circuits. The physical parameters defined include charge, voltage, current, resistance, capacitance and inductance. The laws applied include Ohm's Law, Joule's Law, Kirchhoff's Voltage Law, and Kirchhoff's Current Law. The analysis relies on algebra and exponentials. A required recitation is included as a group problem solving sessions.

  • This laboratory implements the theoretical principles of ELET 1133, Digital Logic. Students learn to build working circuits based upon design goals. Logic solutions utilize transistor-transistor logic (TTL) integrated circuits, simulation software and programmable logic devices (PLD).

  • Digital Logic introduces a student to two-state logic. Logic analysis will use the binary number system and Boolean algebra. Both combinational (AND-OR) logic and sequential (flip-flop) logic are studied. Typical logic designs include 7-segment displays, adders, multiplexers, and counters. Logic designs are implemented using simulation, programmable logic devices and transistor-transistor logic.

  • The fundamentals of prototype design, fabrication, and documentation will be covered. Major topics include: safety, sheet metal fabrication, printed circuit board design and fabrication, schematic and wiring diagram drafting and analysis, computer applications for schematic drawing and printed circuit board layout, circuit construction, troubleshooting fundamentals, soldering techniques and project parts procurement and cost analysis.

  • Laboratory experiments parallel material presented in ELET 1103. The theories and laws governing dc circuits are applied and verified. Hands-on building of electrical circuits reinforces the interpretation of schematic diagrams. Verification includes detailed analysis of the circuit under test by calculation, measurement, and simulation. Outside preparation and laboratory report writing are required.

  • This laboratory runs concurrently with BSET 8003, Introduction to Engineering Technology course. This is an introductory course related to the field of electrical engineering technology. Laboratory topics introduce the students to the fundamental electrical principles and practices. The student will be introduced to various electrical components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, LEDs, transistors, and integrated circuits. Analog and digital meters will be used for measuring electrical quantities, such as resistance, voltage, and current, in electrical circuits.

  • This is an introductory course related to the field of electrical engineering technology. Laboratory topics introduce the students to the fundamental electrical principles and practices. The student will be introduced to various electrical components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, LEDs, transistors, and integrated circuits. Analog and digital meters will be used for measuring electrical quantities, such as resistance, voltage, and current, in electrical circuits.

  • A study of solid state devices, including diodes, bipolar transistors, and field effect transistors. Includes the theory of operation, biasing, stabilization, frequency response, distortion, and gain using mathematical analysis, equivalent circuits, and computer models.

  • A continuation of Circuit Theory I. The emphasis is on the electrical principles, laws, and theorems applicable to sinusoidal ac circuits. Complex number notation is used to evaluate ac circuits. Topics include ac power, resonance, polyphase circuits and transformers.

  • Why is imaginary power so expensive? This course requires students to mind their P's and Q's (real and reactive power). Students will build upon circuit theory concepts as they apply to alternating current using phasor analysis. Complicated networks are analyzed using mesh and nodal matrix methods. MATLAB is introduced as a computational tool. The course emphasis is upon ac power applications including transformers and three-phase systems. Laboratory sessions will back up the analysis with hands on exercises using electronic instrumentation.

  • Fundamentals of both the hardware and software aspects of the microcontroller. A RISC (reduced instruction set computer) microcontroller is used with an in-system programmer to create an engineering development system. Structured programming code is written in assembly language, assembled and downloaded to the controller. Switches, light emitting diodes, seven segment displays, pneumatic solenoids and motors are among the devices that will be connected to the controller.

  • The material in this course parallels and supplements the subject matter in ELET 2103. The use of appropriate electronic test equipment is emphasized, along with computer simulation, and computer aided test equipment.

  • This course will provide an overview of the fabrication and operation of silicon-based integrated circuits including resistors, diodes, transistors and their current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Laboratory exercises teach the basics of IC fabrication and I-V measurements. Oxidation/diffusion, photolithography (spin/bake/expose/develop), etch, and vapor deposition equipment allow students the opportunity to design, build, and test simple solid-state devices.

  • This course provides a comprehensive overview of the converging world of computers and telecommunications. It introduces basic building blocks of telecommunications and most current information on new technologies. It provides an in-depth knowledge of communications fundamentals, data networking, next generation networks, wireless networks, IP protocols, IP telephony, VPN, Digital video and TV standards, optical networking and broadband networking.

  • This course concentrates on the theory and application of operational amplifiers. The gain, frequency response, and impedance of inverting and non-inverting amplifiers are analyzed in detail. Different feedback circuits are studied to realize basic mathematical operations such as summing, integration and differentiation. Operational amplifier topologies are then used to design filters, oscillators, communications circuits and regulated power supplies.

  • This course will introduce current workstation operating systems technologies. The course will include client-side networking technologies and will be an intensive, hands-on, in-depth study of design and integration of current workstation operating systems in an enterprise environment. Laboratory activities will include the installation, configuration, and support of workstation operating system hardware, software, and network connectivity not only on a single server based LAN system, but will also cover tools and techniques for design and support of a large networking system.

  • This laboratory is an experimental study of operational amplifiers and linear integrated circuits as applied to comparators, amplifiers, waveform generations, signal conditioning, and regulated power supplies. Emphasis is placed on design, proper measuring techniques and documentation of results. Device characteristics and limitations will be studied. The use of manufacturer's data sheets is required. Computers are used to design, analyze and test circuits along with manual measuring techniques.

  • Offers the study of analog and digital communication concepts and systems. Students begin by learning the terminology and measurements of the communications industry. The course includes analysis of AM and FM transmission and reception, data communications, and transmission lines. Emphasis is on a systems approach with block diagrams and study of the concepts within each block. The associated laboratory tests and demonstrates the lecture theory. Students investigate a chosen application further in an individual project.

  • A course in networking technology covering the management, troubleshooting and administration of the network operating system and infrastructure portion of LAN (Local-Area-Network) systems.

  • Study of the principles and applications of dc and ac rotating machines and associated protective and control equipment. Basic functions such as control of motor speed and direction of rotation and basic PLC programming are laboratory projects. Servo and stepper motors for motion control are examined.

  • This course provides the student with a realistic experience in semiconductor manufacturing processes. Oxidation/ diffusion, photolithography (spin/bake/expose/develop), etch, and vapor deposition equipment allow students the opportunity to design, build, and test simple solid-state devices.

  • Students will learn the basics of telecommunications and network cabling and wiring devices, as well as suggested best practices and safety issues. The students, through hands-on activities and labs, will learn to install horizontal (work area) and backbone cable. This hands-on, lab-oriented course stresses documentation, design, and installation issues, as well as laboratory safety, on-the-job safety, and working effectively in group environments. This course prepares students for the Panduit Authorized Installer (PAI) certification.

  • The purpose of this course is to provide students with a realistic look at the potential and the limitations of electrical generation through energy conversion. The energy sources include solar, wind and water. The course will include semiconductor properties of photovoltaic cells and the electronic circuits necessary for energy conversion. Using trigonometry, students will be able to calculate the position of the sun at any time or place and calculate the energy available at different panel orientations.

  • This course will introduce server-side operating system networking technologies. It will be an intensive, hands-on, in-depth study of design of current server operating systems in a LAN (Local Area Network) environment. Laboratory activity will include design, development, configuration, and placement of servers and services. The students will design, plan and deploy technical support of server hardware, operating system, and network connectivity. The design of Microsoft latest server operating system will be thoroughly examined.

  • This course will introduce server-side operating system networking technologies. It will be an intensive, hands-on, in-depth study of design of current server operating systems in a LAN (Local Area Network) environment. Laboratory activity will include design, development, configuration, and placement of servers and services. Students will design, plan and deploy technical support of server hardware, operating system, and network connectivity. The design of Microsoft latest server operating system will be thoroughly examined.

  • A student may contract for one to six credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chair. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

  • Electrical principles, laws, theorems and complex notation applicable to AC circuits. Principles of generation and distribution of single and three phase power. Load flow and short circuit analysis.

  • This course offers the study of analog and digital communication concepts and system. Students begin by learning the terminology and measurements used in the communication industry. The course includes analysis of AM, and FM transmission and reception, Single-Sideband communications, Digital Wired and Wireless Communications, Network Communications, and Multiplexing & De-multiplexing techniques. Emphasis is on the system approach with block diagrams, with the presentation of theoretical fundamentals and study of the concepts within each diagram.

  • Individualized hands-on practice and review session for Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) professional exams, as wells as other appropriate certifications.

  • This course teaches students through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, textbook exercises, and labs the skills and abilities necessary to design an Active Directory and network infrastructure that meets the technical and business requirements of an organization. Understanding the design process, the required components, and the integration of technologies are key elements in this course.

  • A student may contract for one to six credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chairperson. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

  • This course is the study of electrical power transmission and conversion. A project involves the design of a dc-dc converter from theory through a completed printed circuit board. Circuit topologies studied include linear, buck, boost and buck-boost converters. On the utility scale, ac circuit theory is applied to grid power flow and transmission line models. Synchronous generators and transmission lines are modeled in theory and examined in the laboratory. Power electronics are analyzed for their role in conversion and transmission.

  • This course will provide an opportunity for the student to become familiar with the technology and applications of microelectromechanical systems. This is one of the fastest growing areas in the semiconductor business. Today's applications include accelerometers for air bag deployment, pressure sensors, flow sensors, optical systems and micromotors. Emphasis is on the different technologies compared to the standard semiconductor processing technologies. The lecture provides necessary understanding of the various process technologies used to fabricate MEMS devices.

  • The course offers the study of advance topics of computer architecture to CET and information systems/technology students. It provides a technical foundation for system design, system implementation, hardware and software and computing resource management. It asks students to solve technical problems and communicate effectively with technical specialists. Emphasis will be on computer architecture, processor technology, data storage technology, data and network communication technology and operating systems.

  • Design and analysis of linear and switching regulators and power converters using state-of-the-art components and devices. Topics to be covered will include: basic building blocks of modern power supply systems; circuits for the generation and processing of pulse and switching waveforms; transistor, rectifier, IC, transformer, inductor, capacitor, and resistor selection; thermal design considerations, feedback and stability analysis; RFI considerations.

  • This course is an introduction to the physics, chemistry and materials of integrated circuit fabrication. Topics include the basic process steps of crystal growth, oxidation, photolithography, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metallization used to build integrated circuits. The laboratory uses a 4-level metal gate PMOS process to fabricate a working integrated circuit test-chip and provide experience in device design, process design, materials evaluation, in-process characterization and device testing.

  • This is a course in network infrastructure concentrating on switch and router configuration and operation to support both LAN and WAN environments. In addition to the fundamentals of routing protocols, topics will include subnetting, VLSM, EIGRP and OSPF routing protocols, packet monitoring and filtering, VLAN configuration, Network Address Translation (NAT), Wireless LANs, IPv6, Voice over IP and security implementation. The laboratory component is hands-on in a multiple router-multiple switch environment.

  • This course prepares the students for the design and implementation of a real-time operating system (RTOS) on an embedded microcontroller. The course is constructed around a project where each student is required to design and prototype a real-time traffic light using MicroC/OS-II operating system loaded on a PIC18F452 microcontroller. The lecture portion of the course is comprised of lectures and quizzes that support the course project.

  • Calculus-based circuit theory includes representation of ideal and non-ideal characteristics of circuit elements. Circuit analysis using fundamental circuit laws, network theorems and standard engineering complex variable notation. Transistor circuits are modeled using realistic parameters including junction capacitances and internal noise generation. Circuit models are applied to amplifier designs for low noise, high frequency response, etc.

  • Students will complete supervised field work in a selected business, industry,government or educational setting. Students carry out a planned program of educational experiences under direct supervision of an owner, manager or supervisor of technology in an organization. Each intern will be supervised by a member of the faculty. Written and oral reports and a journal of work experience activities will be required. Evaluation will be based on the quality of experiences gained from the internship.

  • Students will complete supervised field work in a selected business, industry, government or educational setting. Students carry out a planned program of educational experiences under direct supervision of an owner, manager or supervisor of technology in an organization. Each intern will be supervised by a member of the faculty. Written and oral reports and journal of work experience activities will be required. Evaluation will be based on the quality of experiences gained from the internship.